Anti-Vaxxers Now Have More Fuel to Their Movement

Ruling Diminishes Science

person getting a vaccination
Credit: Shutterstock

It said despite the lack of scientific consensus on the issue, a vaccine could be considered defective if there was “specific and consistent evidence,” including the time between a vaccine’s administration and the onset of a disease, an individual’s previous state of health, the lack of any family history of the disease and a significant number of reported cases of the disease occurring following vaccination.

The court said in a statement that such factors could lead a national court to conclude that “the administering of the vaccine is the most plausible explanation” for the disease and that “the vaccine therefore does not offer the safety that one is entitled to expect.”

The European court’s vaccine ruling is being criticized in the United States because there is no scientific proof that vaccines cause any disease.

Previous page 1 2 3 4 5Next page

Maria Lianos Carbone

Maria Lianos-Carbone is owner of amotherworld.com, a leading lifestyle blog for women. Her first book, "Oh Baby! A Mom's Self-Care Survival Guide for the First Year" will be published Spring 2018. Follow Maria on Instagram @amotherworld.

Related Articles

Close

Adblock Detected

Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker